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George Dyer

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George Dyer is an award-winning tenor who has been compared with Josh Groban and Andrea Bocelli. He is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon Church. He has performed in operas in Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Hawaii, and many more locations. He has been supported by several incredible symphonies in concert, from Jerusalem to Estonia.

George Dyer soared onto the operatic scene in 1996, making his professional debut to rave reviews with the New York City Opera as Ralph Rackstraw in H.M.S. Pinafore at the Lincoln Center in New York City. He has performed extensively to wide acclaim in prestigious opera houses and concert halls across North America and in many countries throughout the world.

Mr. Dyer has been a guest soloist with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir on numerous occasions, including a 2005 worldwide broadcast to over 63 countries, translated in over 75 languages. He has been a district finalist in the Metropolitan Opera auditions and a national finalist in the San Francisco Opera's Merola Program auditions. Reviewers, announcers and fans alike regularly mention his handsome good looks, and his beautiful lyric tenor voice is frequently described as "powerful", "rich", "clear", "silken" and "gorgeous", with "soaring" high notes; audiences often find him "maddeningly charming".

His operatic prowess notwithstanding, Mr. Dyer is a gifted performer of musical theater; he has enchanted countless audiences in the United States and Europe with solo concerts that feature a delightful mix of opera and Broadway favorites (from Mr. Dyer's official website).

George is originally from Virginia, but now resides in Utah with his wife, Clarisse, and their four children. As well as performing, he also teaches voice.

"Athletic, strong and sensual, Dyer also is perfect as Romeo. His high notes have a unique clarity and when singing soft passages in the couple's intimate moments, his phrasing is delicate. His second-act cavatine in the balcony scene could easily seduce even a 21st-century teenager."
--Honolulu Star-Bulletin
More at MormonMusic.org